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Lenin's Tomb

Posted: 14th May 2014 10:05

According to TripAdvisor, Lenin’s Tomb makes for an “interesting” visit.  And interesting is perhaps the only word that can be used to describe this macabre attraction; compelled by a sense of morbid curiosity, visitors file respectfully past the glass coffin of the long (longlong) dead former Soviet Leader  in what can only be described as an usual retelling of the Snow White story.

 Vladimir Lenin died in 1924 and placed in a temporary tomb so that his loyal followers might pay their final respects.  Only they didn’t really seem to have a grasp on temporary, because his final resting place is open free to the public on Tuesdays, Thursdays and weekends.  The queues, though not as long as they were 90 years ago, can still get pretty lengthy – but don’t let boredom get the better of you, as nothing but the utmost respect is demanded from the many security guards that prowl the area.  As hard as it might be, don’t let them see that you find the idea of seeing a formaldehyde-soaked corpse bemusing – perhaps instead try to maintain a visage of quiet reflection and reverence.  Keep your hands out of your pockets, take off your hat and whatever you do, don’t stare.  Lenin’s corpse is very self-conscious.

The entire experience almost seems to be a celebration of the time Soviet authority was complete.  As you tip toe down the dimly lit corridor and past the impressive tomb, you will feel as though you’ve stepped into the past – although Mr Lenin seems to have found a way to cheat the passing of time.  In all honesty, the rumours that he was replaced with a wax work are believable, but it doesn’t make it any less creepy.  Unfortunately, cameras are strictly prohibited, so they’ll be no lasting reminders of your trip; once you’re quickly ushered back out into the daylight of the Red Square, you’ll be left wondering if the entire experience was real.